Keepin’ it real fake, part CCLIV: HTC Tattoo joins the WinMo gang, or appears to anyway

No matter how realistic a KIRF phone looks these days, there’s always a catch somewhere. For instance, this GSM handset is pretty much an exact clone of the HTC Tattoo, except for a couple of debatably important things: the suspiciously-cheerful $169 price tag, and the fact that Windows Mobile (and not Android) is running the show. Oh, and it doesn’t end there: judging by the photo, you’d assume this evil clone runs WinMo 6.5, yet the spec sheet mutters 6.1. A typo? Maybe. Something far more baleful? Maybe. A KIRF OS to go along with the KIRF hardware? Probably. That said, it’s hard to turn down a cheap phone that packs GPS, FM radio, stereo Bluetooth audio, a spare battery and a 2.8-inch touchscreen (240 x 320), but that’s assuming that you’ve no self-esteem to speak of. See if the full kit after the break will seal the deal for you.

Continue reading Keepin’ it real fake, part CCLIV: HTC Tattoo joins the WinMo gang, or appears to anyway

Keepin’ it real fake, part CCLIV: HTC Tattoo joins the WinMo gang, or appears to anyway originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 21 Feb 2010 19:58:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Samsung TL500 and TL350 hands-on

Samsung’s TL500. We caught the bright, bulky beast bristling at PMA in front of a miniature 3D model of the Taj Mahal enclosed within a shadowy cube. The articulating display was indeed quite luminous, and as you can see from the sample shot, the flash-imbued capture is quite nice — same can’t be said sans flash in this instance, though. As for the TL350, we’re always a fan of the analog dials for battery and storage, and the 1,000 frames per second video recording was quite the treat. That said, at 138 x 78 resolution, it’s not practical, but the in-between burst shoots do lend themselves to some fun party tricks. Hardware shots just below, TL500 sample shot after the break.

Continue reading Samsung TL500 and TL350 hands-on

Samsung TL500 and TL350 hands-on originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 21 Feb 2010 18:24:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Inhabitat’s Week in Green: nuclear power, body heat electronics, and Greener Gadgets

The Week in Green is a new item from our friends at Inhabitat, recapping the week’s most interesting green developments and clean tech news for us.

The past week saw several big developments in the energy industry as President Obama announced $8 Billion in loan guarantees for the construction of the first new nuclear plants in 30 years. Nuclear energy is basically emission free, which is a good thing – but what about all of that radioactive waste? Enter GE Hitachi, who announced a system capable of transforming nuclear waste into fuel. Meanwhile our friends in Norway are charging ahead with plans to build the world’s largest wind turbine, and we’re feeling a bit jealous of those forward-thinking Scandinavians.

We also saw signs of the inevitable cyborg uprising as researchers unveiled energy generating gadgets that may one day be implanted within our bodies. MIT is working on a range of heat harvesting electronics that could power biomedical devices such as heart rate and blood sugar monitors. Meanwhile, the University of Michigan has developed an energy recycling prosthetic foot that makes walking easier for amputees. Even the planet is getting wired, as HP gets set to roll out its Central Nervous System for the Earth — an array of billions of sensors that are paving the way for smarter cities, healthier humans, and the “Internet of Things”.

Finally we took a look at two more entries from the Greener Gadgets Design Competition that will be taking the stage next Thursday for live judging: an energy generating glider lounge for public spaces and bass-kicking subwoofer made from recycled car tires.

Inhabitat’s Week in Green: nuclear power, body heat electronics, and Greener Gadgets originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 21 Feb 2010 18:23:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Pentax’s rugged W90, ultra-zoom X90 now all but official

We’ve already seen Pentax tease a few new cameras ahead of PMA, and it looks like another pair have now slipped out at the last minute. That includes the rugged W90 which, among other things, packs a ring of LEDs around the lens to help with close-up shots, and should hold up against even the nastiest conditions (as Pentax has gone out of its way to demonstrate in the photo above). Joining it is the 12.1-megapixel Pentax X90, which is a bit less compact and not weatherproof, but packs a 26x optical zoom in a DSLR-esque body, among other as yet unspecified specs. Still no word on pricing or availability, but Pentax should be getting official with these any day now.

Pentax’s rugged W90, ultra-zoom X90 now all but official originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 21 Feb 2010 17:26:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Nikon CoolPix P100 (and its articulating display) hands-on

Turns out Nikon’s CoolPix P100 is quite a beaut, and our brief time taking snapshots with the compact superzoom at PMA yielded some pretty good pics with relative ease — guess Ashton’s onto something, after all, if you’re not looking for something pocketable. Also of note is the incredibly sturdy articulating display, a great value-add to the $400 piece. Check out more glamor shots below.

Nikon CoolPix P100 (and its articulating display) hands-on originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 21 Feb 2010 16:43:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Sony Alpha ultra-compact concept hands-off: leaves much to the imagination

We’d love nothing more than to extol the merits of Sony’s Alpha ultra-compact concept with an interchangeable lens — which bears a striking resemblance at face value to Olympus and Panasonic’s Micro Four Thirds standard — but alas, the little device is hidden behind glass. Furthermore, all the Sony reps we managed to corner wouldn’t answer our questions. Will the lenses be interchangeable with Sony’s current Alpha DSLR line, or any of the MFT lenses? What’s been cut from traditional Four Thirds models to accommodate for the drop in size? Radio silence, save for a repeat of this morning’s information and a finger point to the adjacent ”
Exmor APS HD CMOS” sign — which, as we know from this morning, is larger than a Four Thirds sensor, but we’re not sure how much. Still, enjoy the pics we managed to take from behind the glass — and also be sure to enjoy the shots of this morning’s other Sony announcements, the
Super Telephoto Lens (500mm F4 G) and the prototype Distagon T 24mm F2 ZA SSM.


Sony Alpha ultra-compact concept hands-off: leaves much to the imagination originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 21 Feb 2010 16:19:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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How to make your speakers sound better: Play better-sounding music

Face the music: subpar recordings make your speakers or headphones sound, well, nowhere as good as they can be. Here’s a list of awesome-sounding recordings. pOriginally posted at a href=”http://news.cnet.com/8301-13645_3-10456456-47.html” class=”origPostedBlog”The Audiophiliac/a/p

OU professor submerses laptop in liquid nitrogen, smashes it to prove a point (video)

Hey, students — pay attention. Not to us, mind you, but to the syllabus provided by your professor. Kieran Mullen, a physics professor at the University of Oklahoma, has a fairly strict rule about gadgets in class: there won’t be any, ever, under any circumstances. Balk all you want (understandable given his own clipped-on cellie), but if you sign up for this guy’s class, you’ll be flipping your phone to “off” and leaving your laptop in the dormitory. And if you try to blaze your own path and slip that netbook into the back row, you might leave bitterly disappointed. As you’ll see clearly in the video past the break, Mr. Mullen sought to make a visual point that laptops weren’t allowed in class (he calls them “a distraction”), and while it seems that the whole stunt was premeditated, most students acknowledged that his point was driven home. In short, he took a defunct machine, submerged it in liquid nitrogen, and proceeded to make the following statement:

“This is just liquid nitrogen, so it alone won’t hurt the computer. But this will.”

Find out exactly what “this” was by hitting that ‘Read More’ button there on the lower left.

[Thanks, studentatOU]

Continue reading OU professor submerses laptop in liquid nitrogen, smashes it to prove a point (video)

OU professor submerses laptop in liquid nitrogen, smashes it to prove a point (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 21 Feb 2010 14:54:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Samsung’s NX lens lineup for 2010

In addition to its already-announced basic zooms and 30mm pancake, Samsung promises a handful more of kit essentials for the yet-to-be-released NX10. pOriginally posted at a href=”http://www.cnet.com/8301-13951_1-10457158-63.html” class=”origPostedBlog”PMA 2010/a/p

Sony’s magical mystery cameras

All the interesting stuff Sony announced at the show is pretty much still on the drawing board. pOriginally posted at a href=”http://www.cnet.com/8301-13951_1-10457138-63.html” class=”origPostedBlog”PMA 2010/a/p